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Voting in the Council of the European Union

Countries like Spain, Poland and  Romania has more votes than Netherlands.

Greece, Portugal, Czech Rep. and Hungary has more votes than Sweden and Austria.

Bulgaria has more votes than Denmark.

Why do these freeloaders have more influence than those who contribute the most?

Net contributors to the EU budget

Which Countries Are the Biggest Boost or Drag on the EU Budget?

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The voting system of the Council as defined in the Treaty of Nice entered into force on 1 February 2003. The voting weights of the member states according to this treaty are shown in the table on the right. The voting system was replaced by the Treaty of Lisbon, effective 1 November 2014.

After the accession of Croatia, on 1 July 2013, at least 260 votes out of a total of 352 by at least 15 member states were required for legislation to be adopted by qualified majority. Croatia had 7 votes (the same as Denmark, Ireland, Lithuania, Slovakia and Finland).[24]

From 1 July 2013, the pass condition translated into:

  1. At least 15 (or 18, if proposal was not made by the Commission) countries,
  2. At least 260 of the total 352 voting weights,
  3. At least 313.6 million people represented by the states that vote in favour.
Population in millions as of 1 January 2003 (Treaty of Nice)
Member state Population Weights Penrose
 Germany 82.54m 16.5% 29 8.4% 9.55%
 France 59.64m 12.9% 29 8.4% 8.11%
 UK 59.33m 12.4% 29 8.4% 8.09%
 Italy 57.32m 12.0% 29 8.4% 7.95%
 Spain 41.55m 9.0% 27 7.8% 6.78%
 Poland 38.22m 7.6% 27 7.8% 6.49%
 Romania 21.77m 4.3% 14 4.1% 4.91%
 Netherlands 17,02m 3.3% 13 3.8% 4.22%
 Greece 11.01m 2.2% 12 3.5% 3.49%
 Portugal 10.41m 2.1% 12 3.5% 3.39%
 Belgium 10.36m 2.1% 12 3.5% 3.38%
 Czech Rep. 10.20m 2.1% 12 3.5% 3.35%
 Hungary 10.14m 2.0% 12 3.5% 3.34%
 Sweden 8.94m 1.9% 10 2.9% 3.14%
 Austria 8.08m 1.7% 10 2.9% 2.98%
 Bulgaria 7.85m 1.5% 10 2.9% 2.94%
 Denmark 5.38m 1.1% 7 2.0% 2.44%
 Slovakia 5.38m 1.1% 7 2.0% 2.44%
 Finland 5.21m 1.1% 7 2.0% 2.39%
 Ireland 3.96m 0.9% 7 2.0% 2.09%
 Lithuania 3.46m 0.7% 7 2.0% 1.95%
 Latvia 2.33m 0.5% 4 1.2% 1.61%
 Slovenia 2.00m 0.4% 4 1.2% 1.48%
 Estonia 1.36m 0.3% 4 1.2% 1.23%
 Cyprus 0.72m 0.2% 4 1.2% 0.89%
 Luxembourg 0.45m 0.1% 4 1.2% 0.70%
 Malta 0.40m 0.1% 3 0.9% 0.66%
 EU 484.20m 100% 345 100% 100%

Read more here at Wikipedia

The Making of the United States of Europe

A 1994 view on “the incumbent poor four” and “the eastern enlargement”.

Eastern Europe is our Mexico!

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The Making of the United States of Europe

Circle of 12 gold stars on a blue background

As you know, one accident rarely comes alone. The Coronavirus has triggered a huge bill, especially in countries already plagued by poor public administration and government debt. Therefore, the countries of the Euro zone, led by the governments of France, Spain and Italy, have convinced Germany to go along with the idea of borrowing €750 billion and provide them directly to the sectors, regions and industries in the euro zone most affectedisla by the crisis.

Who should administer the multibillion ‘recovery instrument’? Correct, that is the job of the geniuses in the European Commission. In Denmark, the idea has been promoted by the left, which since March has been pushing to get the Social Democratic government to agree to joint debt with the euro zone countries to show what they call ‘solidarity’.

Two questions arise. One is pecuniary: should the Danes really jeopardize their relatively good creditworthiness for German carmakers, the French oil industry, the Italian and Spanish tourism industries or all sorts of other sectors here and there, which are naturally affected by draconian shutdowns and their governments’ lack of health emergency systems? Are we to be held accountable for what Emmanuel Macron’s government did or what the Socialist government in Spain didn’t do? It seems a bizarre rationale.

Read more here from Mikael Jalving at Nexit Denktank

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Denmark is one of the four countries nicknamed the ‘Frugal Four’ – along with Austria, Sweden and the Netherlands – which had opposed grants as opposed to loans under the recovery fund, and also insisted on a seven-year EU budget not exceeding 1.0 percent of the blocs gross national income.

Source: EU Observer

Billedresultat for the eastern europe burden eu is a sinking ship

WHAT IS THE MFF?

The MFF sets the limits for EU spending over seven years, as a whole and for different areas of activity.

It is spent on a raft of areas ranging from farm subsidies and regional development, to security projects, Erasmus student exchanges, research, fighting climate change, managing migration, security and defence.

WHY IS IT SO DIFFICULT TO AGREE?

Poorer countries always argue that richer net contributors to the budget should pay more, and there is inevitably an acrimonious stand-off. A failure to agree by the start of 2021 risks a spending freeze on many critical projects.

The 2021-27 MFF is even harder because Britain’s exit from the EU means there is less money in the pot: the departure of the EU’s second-biggest net payer will leave a 75 billion euro hole in the seven-year budget.

SIZE MATTERS

The first nut to crack is just how big the budget should be.

European Council President Charles Michel has proposed a figure of 1.094 trillion euros, equivalent to 1.074% of the 27 countries’ gross national income (GNI). The European Commission has sought a bigger budget equivalent to 1.11% of GNI.

Net beneficiaries – mostly southern and eastern states that get more from the MFF than they put in thanks to cohesion funds and support for their farmers – like the Commission number. They stick together in a group called “The Friends of Cohesion”.

Net contributors frown even on Michel’s lower number, and an alliance known as “The Frugal Four” – Austria, Denmark, the Netherlands and Sweden – insist the budget must not exceed 1.0%.

Germany, the MFF’s biggest net contributor, is sometimes clubbed with these four but is expected to be more flexible.

France, the number two contributor, wants to safeguard CAP funding for its farmers but is uneasy about the fiscal impact of a budget at the upper end of the range.

Net contributors are also fighting to keep a system of “rebates”, reductions to their contributions based on a complicated corrections system. Former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher pioneered the rebate in the 1980s, but net beneficiaries say it must now be scrapped.

Source CNBC

Why You Should Root for the “Frugal Four”

Denmark, Sweden, the Netherlands, and Austria need not only to keep up their opposition, but to gather additional support for the status quo. It is thoroughly irresponsible to condition southern European nations to continuous bailouts from the north in every crisis, while failing to pressure for any significant reforms in the absence of crises.

The “Frugal Four” are a blessing in this time of great irresponsibility.

Source: Austrian Center

Merkel, Macron Back $543 Billion Fund for EU Crisis Recovery

Which Countries Are the Biggest Boost or Drag on the EU Budget?

A 1994 view on “the incumbent poor four” and “the eastern enlargement”.

Eastern Europe is our Mexico!

Spain and Coronavirus | The WORST Recession in EUROPE?

European Defence Agency

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Which Countries Are the Biggest Boost or Drag on the EU Budget?

Which Countries Are the Biggest Boost or Drag on the EU Budget?

With 28 countries and over €15.8 trillion in 2018 GDP (PPP) to its name, there’s no doubt the European Union (EU) is highly influential in economics and politics.

An Unequal Share

Perhaps not surprisingly, Germany and the UK are the top two net contributors in absolute terms. Combined, these two powerhouses had a GDP (PPP) of over €5 trillion in 2018.

At the other end of the scale, Poland tops the list of net beneficiaries with a deficit of -€11,632 million—more than double that of second-place Hungary. In the wake of the European sovereign debt crisis, Greece and Portugal slide into fourth and fifth place respectively.

When population is taken into account, these rankings shift dramatically. Per capita, the Netherlands tops the list with €284 contributed per resident, whereas Luxembourg lands in last place with a deficit of -€2,710. The small country is home to many EU institutions, resulting in high administrative spending: in 2018, administration amounted to 80% of total expenditures.

Here’s a full ranking of the 28 member states, in both absolute (€M) and per capita (€ per resident) terms:

Read more here at Visual Capitalist

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“More than €250 billion were or will be spent since Poland joined the bloc with other former communist states in 2004. In today’s dollars, that’s equivalent to more than the US-funded Marshall Plan provided to western Europe after the second World War.”

Source

Net contributors to the EU budget

Eastern Europe is our Mexico!

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The European Defence Agency (EDA) is an agency of the European Union (EU) that promotes and facilitates integration between member states within the EU’s Common Security and Defence Policy (CSDP). The EDA is headed by the High Representative (HR/VP), and reports to the Council. The EDA was established on 12 July 2004 and is based in the Kortenberg building in Brussels, Belgium, along with a number of other CSDP bodies.

Red with a white cross that extends to the edges of the flag; the vertical part of the cross is shifted to the hoist side

All EU member states take part in the agency, except Denmark, which has opted out of the CFSP.

The EDA and the European External Action Service (EEAS) together form the Secretariat of the Permanent Structured Cooperation (PESCO), the structural integration pursued by 25 of the 28 national armed forces of the EU since 2017.

Mission 

Tasks 

The Council established the EDA “to support the Member States and the Council in their effort to improve European…

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Not Poland’s cash cow: EU blasts Warsaw over lack of ‘contribution’ to Europe

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Poland – Europe’s Israel

The EU Commission berated Poland for its approach to the union, accusing it of using the bloc as a “money machine” to improve its economy, while doing very little to contribute to the “future of Europe.”

“The EU is not just a money machine, a cow that you can milk,” European Commission Vice President Jyrki Katainen said Wednesday. “We are expecting a more substantial contribution from Poland for the future of Europe.”

EU membership has helped Poland greatly and its “economic development has been remarkable,” he added.

While the “future of Europe” part is rather vague, Katainen’s description of the bloc as Poland’s “cash cow” might not be that far-fetched. For example, the EU spent nearly €12 billion (US$13.49bn) on Poland in 2017, while Poland only contributed €3 billion to the EU. Since it became an EU member in 2004, Warsaw has received over €100 billion from the bloc.

Read more here from RT

“More than €250 billion were or will be spent since Poland joined the bloc with other former communist states in 2004. In today’s dollars, that’s equivalent to more than the US-funded Marshall Plan provided to western Europe after the second World War.”

Source

Poland is the country where most immigrants come from in UK, Ireland, Iceland, Norway, Denmark and number two in Germany.

Source

The 2001 UK Census recorded 60,711 Polish-born UK residents; 60,680 of these resided in Great Britain (not including Northern Ireland), compared to 73,951 in 1991.

Following immigration after Poland’s accession to the EU, the Office for National Statistics estimated 911,000 Polish-born residents in the UK in 2016, making Poles the largest overseas-born group, having outgrown the Indian-born population. The 2011 UK Census recorded 579,121 Polish-born residing in England, 18,023 in Wales, 55,231 in Scotland, and 19,658 in Northern Ireland.

Unofficial estimates have put the number of Poles living in the UK higher, at up to one million.

Source

By comparison, barely 14,000 Brits have moved to the eight ex-communist countries.

Source

Poland has overtaken India as the most common non-UK country of birth.

Source

There is a stark contrast between Western and Eastern Europeans.

Those from Eastern Europe received more in welfare than the average UK citizen — and paid less income tax.

Source

A second section of the report looked at only migrants who had arrived since 2001. This found that migrants from Poland and other Eastern European countries were costing £2.8 billion a year.

However, this was counter-balanced by a positive net contribution of the same amount by migrants from the ‘old’ EU, which includes the likes of France and Germany.

Source

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